Adventurers

…there is a thrill seeker even in the bluntest 
personality…

***

Seeing these two guests developing a taste for the unusual, reinforced my belief that there is a thrill-seeker hidden in even the bluntest personality.

ADVENTURERS
Five or so years ago I met at the restaurant a young couple in a late seating. They acted reserved not to say, shy! They didn’t want to order anything they didn’t know. Salad and steak were all they ordered.
A few months later I waited on them again. Both drew me into their conversation about Steinbeck and Cannery Row and somehow we got to talk about frogging. We happened to have frog-legs as a daily special and I talked them into trying some. Both were curios but uncertain if they would like the flavor. In my description I compared the frog-legs with tender chicken-legs. As they sampled one half-order I watched them taste those frog-legs provencale and they loved it.

On their next visits, they left it up to me to bring them whatever I felt they should try. They had sautéed snails, dandelion salad and Monterey Bay prawns. Six months later they had Abalone.

They had been coming three to four times a year. About two years after their first visit, we got to talk about their dining habits. His words reflected that he is treating his wife to dinner in a nice restaurant every month or two. This couple was by no means wealthy. Both worked as teachers to pay their bills. She called it a reward to themselves, the going every four to six weeks to a fine dining establishment. He mentioned as another reason, “We like to see where and how the rich and famous dine.” She emphasized the enjoyment resulting from trying out any for them new and often most unusual food items. Both agreed that the ideas of being adventurous and to try a variety of menu items are rather tempting.

She said “I love it, if the waiter is able to awaken not only some interest but the urge to try whatever specials his chef can create.”
I listened to her husband raving about this young man who waited on them up north, ” . . . he (the waiter) was wonderful. He illustrated the venison and rabbit specials in such colorful language, that we didn’t look at the menu but ate whatever he brought.”

Seeing these two guests developing a taste for the unusual, reinforced my belief that there is a thrill-seeker hidden in even the bluntest personality. It proofed my theory right, namely that a wait person’s job does not have to be dull and boring. A waiter is not limited to taking orders and carry drinks and plates. There is more to it than “Are you ready to order?” and “Enjoy your meal!” as well as “Here is your check!” in being a waiter.

by helmut schonwalder