WINE BOTTLE SIZES

…this are the most common wine bottle sizes…

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The older French wine bottles most likely hold 0.80 liters, a common measure for Burgundy, Champagne and Rhone before 1945. The newer ones hold 0.75 liters. That’s the measure used for Bordeaux and most Californian wines too.
WINE BOTTLE SIZES
Wine is made in casks or tanks and then filled into bottles. One would think there is a norm, a common standard for bottle sizes used all over the world. There is not, at least not yet. Looking at the bottle can give the consumer an indication where a certain wine was bottled. With German wines, if it’s in a round short bottle, a so-called Bocksbeutel, its a Frankenwine. One can safely assume that Moselwine is not sold in brown bottles with long necks and Rhine wine not in green bottles. With the French wines one can be sure that Bordeaux wines are never bottled in Burgundy shape bottles and Burgundy wine growers would never think of offering their wine in Bordeaux style bottles.
So far about bottle shapes. Now about sizes: Most German wine bottles are 0.70 liters. Some bottles from Alsace are 0.72 liters.
The older French wine bottles most likely hold 0.80 liters, a common measure for Burgundy, Champagne and Rhone before 1945. The newer ones hold 0.75 liters. That’s the measure used for Bordeaux and most Californian wines too.
There are other common measures like the liter bottle and the 0.70 liter bottle. If unsure look underneath the bottle, it usually states the size on the bottom. Now about the bigger sizes, usually these are show bottles and more decorative than practical and I suggest always check the bottom of the bottle to know exactly what you have if you want to know the bottle’s size.

And here is a quick a quick reference guide and volumes to the most common larger than usual bottles:

Magnum = 2 bottles
Tregnum or Tappit-hen = 3 bottles

Jeroboam (Champagne) = 4 bottles ( large bottle, large bowl, engl.slang as per 1950 unabridged Webster dictionary)

Double Magnum = 4 bottles

Rehoboam = 6 bottles (a very large bowl, bottle container, as per 1950 unabridged Webster dictionary)

Methusaleh (Champagne) = 8 bottles (the bigger the bottle the longer quality wine or champagne will be be able to age, in the biggest Champagne bottle one assumed wine could reach Methusaleh ages)

Imperiale = 8-9 bottles (english measurement)

Salmanazer = approx. 12 bottles (from Salma, a measure of capacity used in Italy and Sicily, as per 1950 unabridged Webster dictionary)

Balthazar = approx. 16 bottles (King standing for king-size)

Nebuchadnezzar = approx. 20 bottles (King of Babylon standing for biggest king-size ever made)

by helmut schonwalder